What diseases do cats get?

RABIES – The rabies virus attacks the brain and is always fatal. Vaccination is the most effective means of control. The first rabies vaccination is given at 16-weeks of age, boostered 12-months later, and subsequently every three years afterwards.

FELINE PANLEUKOPENIA – Sometimes called “feline distemper” causes severe vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration. It is the most widespread disease of cats and causes severe vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration. It is the most widespread disease of cats and causes high death loss especially among kittens. The disease is caused by a virus and is highly contagious.

FELINE RHINOTRACHEITIS – Is a widespread respiratory disease caused by a virus. It is most severe in small kittens and can cause profuse discharge from the eyes and nose.

FELINE CALICIVIRUS – Causes a variety of symptoms including fever, excess salivation and mouth or tongue ulcers. it is usually less fatal then rhinotracheitis or panleukopenia.

FELINE PNEUMONITIS – A respiratory infection with symptoms resembling feline viral rhinotracheitis. The discease is caused by the organism Chlamydia psittaci and can be complicated by associated bacterial infections.

FELINE LEUKEMIA – Is a form of cancer in cats which is usually fatal. The disease, caused by a virus, can lead to tumor growth nearly anywhere in the body as well as a variety of other symptoms. Infected cats are unable to resist other diseases and may die from associated infections. Testing for the disease is recommended prior to initiating a vaccination program.

FELINE IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS – Is a fatal viral infection that interferes with the immune system of a cat. The virus lives in the blood of an infected cat and is carried in their system throughout their life. Infected cats are unable to resist other diseases and often die from associated infections.

FELINE INFECTIOUS PERITONITIS – A disease caused by a coronavirus. The virus is spread by direct cat to cat contact or by contact with contaminated surfaces. There are 2 manifestations of the disease, wet and dry and both have nonspecific symptoms such as intermittent inappetence, depression, rough hair coat, weight loss, and fever. There is no cure and the disease is considered fatal.

CANINE/FELINE GIARDIASIS – Is caused by a waterborne parasite called Giardia Lamblia. The parasite is found in untreated water, i.e. puddles, ponds and creeks. Symptoms include severe diarrhea, weight loss, fever, dehydration and nausea.